New Port Richey and Trinity, FL Dentist
James C. Lewis, DMD
4101 Little Rd
New Port Richey, FL 34655
(727) 372-7887
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4101 Little Road
New Port Richey, FL 34655

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Posts for: June, 2018

By James C. Lewis, DMD
June 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   fluoride  
DontForgetHiddenFluorideSourcesYourFamilyCouldbeIngesting

In the last half century, fluoride has become an effective weapon against tooth decay. The naturally occurring mineral helps strengthen enamel, the teeth's hard, protective cover.

Although it's safe for consumption overall, too much during early tooth development can lead to fluorosis, a brownish, mottled staining in enamel. To avoid it, a child's daily consumption of fluoride should optimally be kept at around 0.05-0.07 milligrams per kilogram of body weight, or an amount equal to one-tenth of a grain of salt per two pounds of weight.

The two main therapeutic fluoride sources have limits to help maintain this balance: utilities that fluoridate drinking water are required to add no more than 4 parts fluoride per million (ppm) of water; toothpaste manufacturers likewise only add a small amount of fluoride compared to clinical gels and pastes dentists apply to teeth for added decay protection.

But drinking water and toothpaste aren't the only sources of fluoride your child may encounter. Even if you have a non-fluoridated water supply, you should still keep a close watch on the following items that could contain fluoride, and discuss with us if you should take any action in regard to them.

Infant formula. The powdered form especially if mixed with fluoridated water can result in fluoride concentrations 100 to 200 times higher than breast or cow's milk. If there's a concern, use fluoride-free distilled or bottled spring water to mix formula.

Beverages. Many manufacturers use fluoridated water preparing a number of packaged beverages including sodas (two-thirds of those manufactured exceed .6 ppm), soft drinks and reconstituted fruit juices. You may need to limit your family's consumption of these kinds of beverages.

Certain foods. Processed foods like cereals, soups or containing fish or mechanically separated chicken can have high fluoride concentrations, especially if fluoridated water was used in their processing. When combined with other fluoride sources, their consumption could put children at higher risk for fluorosis.

Toothpaste. Although mentioned previously as a moderate fluoride source, you should still pay attention to how much your child uses. It doesn't take much: in fact, a full brush of toothpaste is too much, even for an adult. For an infant, you only need a smear on the end of the brush; as they grow older you can increase it but to no more than a pea-sized amount.

If you would like more information on fluoride and how it strengthens teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Fluoride & Fluoridation in Dentistry.”


By James C. Lewis, DMD
June 12, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Cerec Crowns  

crowns and bridgesThanks to CEREC, you can receive a crown in just one dental visit. Trinity and New Port Richey, FL, dentist Dr. James Lewis restores damaged teeth with CEREC crowns and also uses them to help patients enhance their smiles.

The CEREC process saves time

CEREC crowns are created in your New Port Richey dentist's office, eliminating the need for a dental laboratory. Receiving a crown used to require a multi-step process. After your tooth is reduced in size, your dentist makes an impression of your mouth that is used to create your crown in an off-site dental laboratory. At the end of the visit, you receive a temporary crown and make an appointment to return to the office when your permanent crown is ready.

When your tooth is restored with a CEREC crown, you'll only need to schedule one dental appointment. After your tooth is reduced, your dentist will take a digital impression and design your restoration using CAD/CAM technology. The completed crown design will be sent to an in-office milling machine that will create your new crown from a block of ceramic or resin. You'll leave the office wearing your permanent crown.

CEREC crowns offer several important benefits

CEREC crowns offer a few advantages that just aren't possible with porcelain or porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns, such as:

  • No Uncomfortable Impressions: Soft putty is used to create impressions needed for traditional crowns. The process takes several minutes and can cause gagging in some patients. The digital scanner used for CEREC impressions requires no putty, eliminates gagging, and only takes a few seconds.
  • Less Tooth Reduction: Whether you receive a CEREC crown or a traditional restoration, your tooth must be reduced in size to ensure that the crown will fit correctly. CEREC requires less reduction of tooth structure, which helps keep your tooth stronger.
  • Immediate Correction of Issues: Most CEREC crowns offer a perfect fit, but if a fit issue does occur, a new crown can be created while you wait. If there's a problem with a porcelain crown, you'll need to wait about two weeks to receive another restoration.

Protect your smile with CEREC crowns. Call New Port Richey and Trinity, FL, dentist Dr. James Lewis at (727) 372-7887 to schedule your appointment.


By James C. Lewis, DMD
June 10, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   bonding  
ARoyalFix

So you’re tearing up the dance floor at a friend’s wedding, when all of a sudden one of your pals lands an accidental blow to your face — chipping out part of your front tooth, which lands right on the floorboards! Meanwhile, your wife (who is nine months pregnant) is expecting you home in one piece, and you may have to pose for a picture with the baby at any moment. What will you do now?

Take a tip from Prince William of England. According to the British tabloid The Daily Mail, the future king found himself in just this situation in 2013. His solution: Pay a late-night visit to a discreet dentist and get it fixed up — then stay calm and carry on!

Actually, dental emergencies of this type are fairly common. While nobody at the palace is saying exactly what was done for the damaged tooth, there are several ways to remedy this dental dilemma.

If the broken part is relatively small, chances are the tooth can be repaired by bonding with composite resin. In this process, tooth-colored material is used to replace the damaged, chipped or discolored region. Composite resin is a super-strong mixture of plastic and glass components that not only looks quite natural, but bonds tightly to the natural tooth structure. Best of all, the bonding procedure can usually be accomplished in just one visit to the dental office — there’s no lab work involved. And while it won’t last forever, a bonded tooth should hold up well for at least several years with only routine dental care.

If a larger piece of the tooth is broken off and recovered, it is sometimes possible to reattach it via bonding. However, for more serious damage — like a severely fractured or broken tooth — a crown (cap) may be required. In this restoration process, the entire visible portion of the tooth may be capped with a sturdy covering made of porcelain, gold, or porcelain fused to a gold metal alloy.

A crown restoration is more involved than bonding. It begins with making a 3-D model of the damaged tooth and its neighbors. From this model, a tooth replica will be fabricated by a skilled technician; it will match the existing teeth closely and fit into the bite perfectly. Next, the damaged tooth will be prepared, and the crown will be securely attached to it. Crown restorations are strong, lifelike and permanent.

Was the future king “crowned” — or was his tooth bonded? We may never know for sure. But it’s good to know that even if we’ll never be royals, we still have several options for fixing a damaged tooth. If you would like more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Crowns and Bridgework.”




Dentist New Port Richey FL James Lewis DMD

James Lewis, DMD

Dr. James Lewis prides himself on establishing personal relationships with his patients so he can help make their dreams of having a beautiful, healthy smile come true...

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